Lolo (St. Paul), Jean Baptiste

Lolo (St. Paul), Jean Baptiste

Jean Baptiste Lolo (born 1798, date of death unknown), also known as St. Paul or Chief St. Paul, or Chief Lolo, was an employee and interpreter with the Hudson’s Bay Company in pre-Confederation British Columbia, Canada. First serving in the region at Fort Fraser in the New Caledonia fur district, he acquired the nickname there of St. Paul because of his affection for that saint. He was the right-hand man of John Tod and followed him to Fort Kamloops, where Tod was Chief Trader from 1841 to 1843, and remained in that region for the rest of his life. He acquired such great respect among the local Secwepemc people as to become regarded as a chief (Wikipedia).

Bailey, Jann L.M.

Bailey, Jann L.M.

Jann has been the director of the Kamloops Art Gallery since 1987. During her tenure at the KAG Jann has been president of the Western Canada Art Association, the Canadian Art Museum Directors Organization, and the Canadian Museums Association.

She has been on the boards for the Kamloops Centennial Committee, Kamloops Chamber of Commerce, Kamloops Hospice Association, Multi-Cultural Society, the City’s Economic Development Commission, and most recently, on the committee for an arts school in Kamloops. From 1996 to 2000, she worked as a provincial appointee on the board of directors for the Royal British Columbia Museum, and from 1995 to 2001 she was appointed to the board of the British Columbia Lottery Corporation, holding positions of both chair of the Compensation Committee, and Vice President.

In 1993, Jann received the Governor General’s Canada 125 Award; in 1995 the YM/YWCA’s Woman of Distinction Award in the cultural field; and, in 2003, the Queen’s Jubilee Medal.

Cartwright, Kenna

Cartwright, Kenna

Kenna was born on June 4, 1938 and died in Kamloops on July 26, 1991. She grew up on an orchard in Oyama, B.C. and married John in 1960. They had two sons and moved to Kamloops in 1967.

Her political career included:

Three terms school trustee.
Member Cariboo College Board.
Voted Kamloops’ Woman of the Year.
Six years as Alderman.
Kamloops’ first female Mayor.
Kenna succeeded in making Kamloops a better place to live. Her popularity amongst voters was confirmed that she was a sincere servant of the people.

She was instrumental in:

Promoting Kamloops as Tournament Capital of B.C.
Building Riverside Coliseum.
Bringing the 1993 Summer Games to Kamloops.
She was very concerned about environmental issues and was a strong advocate for water and air quality in our community.

She always encouraged people, including herself, to be the best they could be. (from Stu Cartwright)

Rothenburger, Mel

Rothenburger, Mel

Mel was born in 1944 and raised in the Okanagan Valley, Mel Rothenburger is a descendant of Hudson’s Bay Company Factor Donald McLean of Fort Kamloops. Rothenburger most notably became editor of the Kamloops Daily News. Having known former Kamloops mayor and evangelist Phil Gaglardi since Gaglardi was a controversial Social Credit cabinet minister in 1970, Rothenburger wrote a biography of the ex-Highways Minister, Friend o’ Mine (Orca Books, 1991). Rothenburger’s earlier books were ‘We’ve Killed Johnny Ussher! The Story of The Wild McLean Boys and Alex Hare (Mitchell Press, 1973)’ and The Chilcotin War. The father of the ‘Wild McLeans’–Allan, Charlie and Allan; some of the most notorious outlaws in B.C. history–was the HBC Factor Donald McLean. He was Mayor of Kamloops, from 200 to 2005 and returned the Kamloops Daily news until retiring in 2012. Rothenburger continued to write columns for The Daily News until it ceased publication Jan. 11, 2014, does regular commentary for CBC Radio and writes a blog at http://armchairmayor.wordpress.com .

Black. Samuel

Black. Samuel

Photo compliments of the Kamloops Museum

Samual was a fur trader (b 3 May 1780, Pitsligo, Scotland; d 8 Feb 1841, Kamloops). He came to Canada in 1802 and served for many years with the North West Co. at at trading posts in the Athabasca District. Stopping at nothing to defeat his HBC competitors, he was a notorious ruffian and bully. When the HBC absorbed the NWC in 1821, Black was refused a job in the reorganized company because of his history. But in 1823 he was taken on as officer in charge at Fort St John on the upper Peace River. He moved posts regularly until 1830, when he was stationed at Thompson’s River Post (Kamloops). In 1837 he became chief factor in charge of all the posts in the district. Black was never much of a diplomat, and his relations with the Aboriginal people were poor. It was not unexpected when a dispute with a Secwepemc (Shuswap) chief ended in Black’s murder. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)

Mclean, Donald

Mclean, Donald

Photo compliments of the Kamloops Museum

Don was a fur trader (b 1805, Tobermory, Scotland; d 17 July 1864 near Chilko Lake). He joined the HBC in 1833 and served in the Oregon Territory until he transferred to Fort Alexandria on the upper Fraser River in 1842. For the next 18 years he rose through the ranks, serving at different posts in New Caledonia until he was put in charge of Fort Kamloops in 1855. He was an effective trader known for harsh treatment of his First Nations clients. In 1860 he resigned from the HBC rather than accept a transfer out of BC. With his family he settled at Hat Creek south of Clinton, where he farmed, raised livestock and ran a stopping place on the Cariboo Wagon Road. In 1864, during the so-called Chilcotin War, he joined the pursuit of the fugitive Tsilhqot’in and was shot and killed by one of them. His sons were members of the notorious Mclean Gang of outlaws. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)

Fortune, William

Fortune, William

William was a farmer, businessman (b 1838, Yorkshire, England; d 1 Dec 1914, Kamloops). After immigrating to Ontario, he joined the party of Overlanders who travelled across the continent in 1862 to join the Cariboo Gold Rush. He worked for the HBC in Kamloops, then moved west to settle at Tranquille, where he developed a ranch and farm and built the first flour mill in the Interior. In 1878 he built the sidewheel steamer Lady Dufferin to haul supplies on the Thompson and Shuswap waterways. He sold his property for use as a tuberculosis sanitarium in 1907 and returned to Kamloops, where he was prominent in business until his death. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)

Tod, John

Tod, John

John was a fur trader (b Oct 1794, Dumbartonshire, Scotland; d 31 Aug 1882, Victoria). He came to Canada in 1811 as a clerk with the HBC attached to Lord Selkirk’s group of colonists bound for the Red River. In 1840 he took command of Fort Alexandria on the upper Fraser River, and he served as senior officer at Fort Thompson (Kamloops) from 1842 to 1849. In failing health, he retired from the HBC in 1850 after almost 40 years in its service, and settled near Fort Victoria. In 1851 he was appointed to the Legislative Council advising the governor of Vancouver Island, a position he held until 1858 when he resigned to devote all his energies to his farm and his sizable family. The Tod home is now a heritage house. Tod Mt near Kamloops is named for him, as is Tod Inlet on southern Vancouver Island. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)