Tennant, Paul

Tennant, Paul

Paul was born in Saskatchewan and raised in Kamloops. After graduating from the University of British Columbia, he obtained his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago as a Woodrow Wilson National Fellow. He then spent a year in the United States Congress as the first Canadian to hold a Congressional Fellowship. Paul has taught at the University of British Columbia since 1966, specializing in local government, British Columbia government and politics, and the politics of aboriginal peoples. He has been adviser to First Nations and municipalities in Alberta, the Yukon, and British Columbia, to the British Columbia, Yukon, and federal governments, to the British Columbia Claims Task Force, the British Columbia Treaty Commission, the Council for Yukon First Nations, and to aboriginal land councils in Australia. Paul is author of Aboriginal Peoples and Politics: The Indian Land Question in British Columbia (UBC Press, 1990).

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Chief Louis

Chief Louis

Photo compliments of the Kamloops Museum

Clexlixqen (Louis) was a Secwepemc chief (b 1828, Kamloops; d 12 Apr 1915, Kamloops). He was a guide, trader and farmer and one of the wealthiest members of the Kamloops First Nation of the Secwepemc (Shuswap) people. After becoming chief in 1852 he converted to Catholicism and was active in supporting schools and other church activities on the reserve. He also played a leading role in asserting Secwepemc land claims and in trying to create an alliance among the Interior First Nations to pursue the land issue. He took part in a delegation to Great Britain to see Queen Victoria and in 1909 was a founding member of the Interior Tribes of BC. A painted portrait of Chief Louis hangs in the current Kamloops Chief’s office. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)