Lolo (St. Paul), Jean Baptiste

Lolo (St. Paul), Jean Baptiste

Jean Baptiste Lolo (born 1798, date of death unknown), also known as St. Paul or Chief St. Paul, or Chief Lolo, was an employee and interpreter with the Hudson’s Bay Company in pre-Confederation British Columbia, Canada. First serving in the region at Fort Fraser in the New Caledonia fur district, he acquired the nickname there of St. Paul because of his affection for that saint. He was the right-hand man of John Tod and followed him to Fort Kamloops, where Tod was Chief Trader from 1841 to 1843, and remained in that region for the rest of his life. He acquired such great respect among the local Secwepemc people as to become regarded as a chief (Wikipedia).

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Bailey, Jann L.M.

Bailey, Jann L.M.

Jann has been the director of the Kamloops Art Gallery since 1987. During her tenure at the KAG Jann has been president of the Western Canada Art Association, the Canadian Art Museum Directors Organization, and the Canadian Museums Association.

She has been on the boards for the Kamloops Centennial Committee, Kamloops Chamber of Commerce, Kamloops Hospice Association, Multi-Cultural Society, the City’s Economic Development Commission, and most recently, on the committee for an arts school in Kamloops. From 1996 to 2000, she worked as a provincial appointee on the board of directors for the Royal British Columbia Museum, and from 1995 to 2001 she was appointed to the board of the British Columbia Lottery Corporation, holding positions of both chair of the Compensation Committee, and Vice President.

In 1993, Jann received the Governor General’s Canada 125 Award; in 1995 the YM/YWCA’s Woman of Distinction Award in the cultural field; and, in 2003, the Queen’s Jubilee Medal.

Tennant, Paul

Tennant, Paul

Paul was born in Saskatchewan and raised in Kamloops. After graduating from the University of British Columbia, he obtained his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago as a Woodrow Wilson National Fellow. He then spent a year in the United States Congress as the first Canadian to hold a Congressional Fellowship. Paul has taught at the University of British Columbia since 1966, specializing in local government, British Columbia government and politics, and the politics of aboriginal peoples. He has been adviser to First Nations and municipalities in Alberta, the Yukon, and British Columbia, to the British Columbia, Yukon, and federal governments, to the British Columbia Claims Task Force, the British Columbia Treaty Commission, the Council for Yukon First Nations, and to aboriginal land councils in Australia. Paul is author of Aboriginal Peoples and Politics: The Indian Land Question in British Columbia (UBC Press, 1990).

Singh, Gur

Singh, Gur

Dr Gur Singh is a dedicated member of British Colombia’s medical community. He established the first Neurosurgical Unit in the Interior of B.C., as well as the first Neuro Intensive Care Unit. He served on the Board of British Columbia Medical Association for 15 years. Gur was President of the British Columbia Medical Association from 1991-1992. As president of the Downtown Rotary Club, Gur initiated the smoking awareness program for elementary grades in the Kamloops School District. In 1992, Gur was awarded the Canada 125 Anniversary Commemorative Medal, and in 2002 he was awarded the Queens Jubilee Medal.

Gur has been active in the Kamloops Tennis Association serving as its president. Gur sponsored the men’s doubles Dalin-Singh Tournament, along with Bill Dalin, now in its 20th year.

In 2004, Gur helped raise $17,000 for the Kamloops Brain Injury Association through the First Annual Gur Singh Invitational Golf Tournament. (from Arjun Singh)

Smith, John Freemont

Smith, John Freemont

Photo compliments of the Kamloops Museum

Best-known as the first alderman of black ancestry in B.C., John Freemont Smith was an active promoter of Kamloops and founder of many civic organizations.

Born in 1850 in the Danish West Indies, John Freemont Smith arrived in Victoria, British Columbia in 1872, where he married. In 1884 the Smiths came to Kamloops, opening a shoe store. Soon after they settled at Louis Creek where John spearheaded mineral exploration in the North Thompson Valley.

Back to Kamloops in 1890, Smith became a newspaper editor and helped to found the Kamloops Agricultural Association (1895), the Conservative Association (1898), and the Board of Trade (1902), among other organizations. He was an alderman on Kamloops City Council (1902-1907) and Indian Agent for the Kamloops District (1912-23).

The Freemont (sic) Block in the 200 block Victoria Street was his office where he died at age 84 in1934. (from Ken Favrholdt)

Rothenburger, Mel

Rothenburger, Mel

Mel was born in 1944 and raised in the Okanagan Valley, Mel Rothenburger is a descendant of Hudson’s Bay Company Factor Donald McLean of Fort Kamloops. Rothenburger most notably became editor of the Kamloops Daily News. Having known former Kamloops mayor and evangelist Phil Gaglardi since Gaglardi was a controversial Social Credit cabinet minister in 1970, Rothenburger wrote a biography of the ex-Highways Minister, Friend o’ Mine (Orca Books, 1991). Rothenburger’s earlier books were ‘We’ve Killed Johnny Ussher! The Story of The Wild McLean Boys and Alex Hare (Mitchell Press, 1973)’ and The Chilcotin War. The father of the ‘Wild McLeans’–Allan, Charlie and Allan; some of the most notorious outlaws in B.C. history–was the HBC Factor Donald McLean. He was Mayor of Kamloops, from 200 to 2005 and returned the Kamloops Daily news until retiring in 2012. Rothenburger continued to write columns for The Daily News until it ceased publication Jan. 11, 2014, does regular commentary for CBC Radio and writes a blog at http://armchairmayor.wordpress.com .

The Overlanders

The Overlanders

The Overlanders were gold seekers from Ontario who trekked across the western Interior to the Cariboo between 1858 and 1862. Most of them were young men of limited means who hoped to make their fortunes in the Gold Rush. The largest group made the crossing in 1862. Members gathered at the Red River Settlement in Manitoba, and the first group of about 150 people, led by Thomas McMicking, set out early in June. Two smaller groups followed. The main party’s only woman, Catherine Schubert, traveled with her husband and three young children; their fourth child was born after they arrived in BC. They journeyed by Red River cart and packhorse, crossing the plains to Fort Edmonton. Another group went overland south toward Kamloops, two were drowned along the way and the rest almost starved. A few Overlanders found gold in the Cariboo; many remained in BC and went on to have successful careers. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)