Martin, Lesra

Martin, Lesra

Lesra Martin, born in 1963 in Queens, New York. Despite passing school, he remained illiterate until he was sixteen. Regardless, Lesra was always keen to learn especially after a near-death fall from a five-storey building when he was 12.

His life changed when a group of Canadian entrepreneurs offered to help with his education in Canada after realizing his potential. He graduated high school in Ontario and received a BA (Honours) in Anthropology from the University of Toronto. He went on to obtain a law degree from Dalhousie University.

Martin became involved with the release of Rubin “Hurricane” Carter after serving 22 years in prison. With the help of the Canadian group, Carter was released in1983.

Martin’s story is portrayed in the film The Hurricane starring Denzel Washington as Carter. The National Film Board also produced The Journey of Lesra Martin.

He and his wife Cheryl have practiced law in Kamloops for over ten years.

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Shupe, Terry

Shupe, Terry

Through his professional designation as a provincial court judge, Terry has given to society. His other titles prove his extraordinary commitment to the community. Founding chairman of the Crisis Centre, trustee for Big Brothers, founding and honorary life chairman for Western Canada Theatre Company, and an instrumental member in the construction of the Sagebrush Theatre, he is an asset to many in the Kamloops area. It is abundantly clear that Judge Shupe has given our province so much more than twenty-five years as a trial judge. His past accolades reflect a passion for the arts and his fellow community members. His latest endeavors involve traveling to countries in strife, and mentoring judges. The Independent Judicial Commission cites Judge Shupe’s contributions as ‘exemplary’. In his spare time, Judge Shupe has taken up the hobby of woodworking. Truly representative of his nature, the wooden toys and furniture he creates are then donated to Christmas Amalgamated. (From website)

Fulton, Davie

Fulton, Davie

Edmund Davie Fulton was born on Mar 10, 1916 in Kamloops and died on May 22, 2000 in Vancouver. As a UBC student he won a Rhodes scholarship (1937) to study at Oxford.

During WWII he served overseas with the Seaforth Highlanders, then returned to Kamloops to practice law.

Fulton was first elected to Parliament as a Conservative in 1945 when he was only 30 years old. When the Tories formed a minority government the next year, he served in the cabinet as minister of justice from 1957 to 1962. During this period he was the chief federal negotiator for the Columbia River Treaty. In 1962 he also served briefly as minister of public works.

Fulton briefly headed the BC Conservative Party. He became the first chair of the BC Law Reform Commission. From 1973 he served as a judge on the BC Supreme Court and was inducted into the Order of Canada in 1992. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)

Kamloops RCMP

Kamloops RCMP

Members of the RCMP come from across Canada to live and work in Kamloops. We know them by their faces and their deeds. Through the years they have coached sports teams, helped stranded travelers, educated kids on safety and drugs, assisted during car, boat and train accidents, disasters, fires and emergencies, come to the aid of hurt and distraught people. Kamloops RCMP have raised more than $500,000 for the bone marrow registry in aid of cancer research.

They give of themselves each and everyday that they come to work and sadly occasionally have given the ultimate sacrificed, their lives, to keep the streets and the citizens of Kamloops safe.

Three Kamloops RCMP died in June, 1962, while investigating reports of an armed gunman. They were (left to right) Const. Elwood Keck, 25; Const. Gordon Pedersen, 25; and Const. Donald Weisgerber, 23.

Our RCMP are remarkable Kamloopsians who are often called upon to do extraordinary things. (from Cpl. Fran Bethell)

Miner, Billy

Miner, Billy

Miner was a outlaw (b 1846, Bowling Green, KY; d 2 Sept 1913, Millidgeville, GA). He left home at age 16, went west and began robbing stagecoaches. Before he was 20 he was doing time in the notorious San Quentin Penitentiary. He spent most of the next 30 years in prison, where he worked at hard labour and suffered abusive maltreatment in the penal system. His final term was for 20 years; undaunted, he turned to robbing trains after his release. Once again on the run, he crossed into Canada in 1904 and settled in the Nicola Valley south of Kamloops. On 13 Sept 1904 he held up a CPR train at Mission. A massive search followed and Miner and his gang were captured near Douglas Lake. Miner became a folk hero in BC for his gentlemanly ways and the fact that he targeted the unpopular CPR. An award-winning 1982 film, The Grey Fox, dramatized his career. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)