Shanks, Michael

Shanks, Michael

Michael Garrett Shanks was born December 15, 1970 in Vancouver and grew up in Kamloops. After graduating from the University of British Columbia with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre in 1994, he appeared in several stage productions, serving a two-year apprenticeship with the prestigious Stratford Festival in Ontario. He made guest appearances on TV series like Highlander and University Hospital, appeared in the TV movie A Family Divided and had a small role in The Call of the Wild, before winning the role of Daniel Jackson on the Canadian-American military science fiction television series Stargate SG-1.

Shanks lives in Vancouver with his wife Lexa Doig and two children. He enjoys playing hockey, and once considered playing professionally. He played the part of a school hockey coach in the 2006 TV movie Under the Mistletoe (Wikipedia).

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Turner, Rick

Turner, Rick

Rick Turner (born in Trail, B.C. 1947) is the oldest of 4 children born to English parents. Rick worked as a smelterman at Cominco mine and attended Selkirk College part time, later completing a teaching degree at UBC in 1973. He taught high school English in Masset, QCI, Barriere and Kamloops before retiring. Rick became active in the union after his first year of teaching but his social activism began in his teens when he became aware of the damaging stereotypes against friends who were Italians, Mohawks, and against his sisters.

He is a long-time NDP supporter and became president of the Kamloops-North Thompson riding association in 2009. He and Fawn Knox began the Kamloops Health Coalition in 2006 which now has over 200 members (from an autobiography).

Lolo (St. Paul), Jean Baptiste

Lolo (St. Paul), Jean Baptiste

Jean Baptiste Lolo (born 1798, date of death unknown), also known as St. Paul or Chief St. Paul, or Chief Lolo, was an employee and interpreter with the Hudson’s Bay Company in pre-Confederation British Columbia, Canada. First serving in the region at Fort Fraser in the New Caledonia fur district, he acquired the nickname there of St. Paul because of his affection for that saint. He was the right-hand man of John Tod and followed him to Fort Kamloops, where Tod was Chief Trader from 1841 to 1843, and remained in that region for the rest of his life. He acquired such great respect among the local Secwepemc people as to become regarded as a chief (Wikipedia).

Schubert, Catherine O’Hare

Schubert, Catherine O'Hare

Catherine was a pioneer settler (b 23 Apr 1835, Rathfryland, Ireland; d 18 July 1918, Armstrong). She moved to America in 1850 with her family and lived in New York until her marriage in 1856 to Augustus Schubert, a German immigrant. The couple moved west to St Paul, MN, then in 1860 north to Fort Garry, where they ran an inn. Two years later they joined a party of Overlanders trekking west to the goldfields. Catherine, with her 3 young children, was the only woman with the party and she gave birth to a fourth child shortly after her arrival at Kamloops. The couple settled at Lillooet and began farming. When Augustus was absent prospecting for gold, she ran the farm and a local school. They moved to land near Armstrong in 1883. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)

Tennant, Paul

Tennant, Paul

Paul was born in Saskatchewan and raised in Kamloops. After graduating from the University of British Columbia, he obtained his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago as a Woodrow Wilson National Fellow. He then spent a year in the United States Congress as the first Canadian to hold a Congressional Fellowship. Paul has taught at the University of British Columbia since 1966, specializing in local government, British Columbia government and politics, and the politics of aboriginal peoples. He has been adviser to First Nations and municipalities in Alberta, the Yukon, and British Columbia, to the British Columbia, Yukon, and federal governments, to the British Columbia Claims Task Force, the British Columbia Treaty Commission, the Council for Yukon First Nations, and to aboriginal land councils in Australia. Paul is author of Aboriginal Peoples and Politics: The Indian Land Question in British Columbia (UBC Press, 1990).

Trotter, Al

Trotter, Al

Al was born in 1922 and lives in Kamloops. He fought in Europe as a pilot where he flew 44 missions before being shot down after a bombing raid on the Opel Car Works in Russelsheim, Germany. He spent 268 days in a prisoner of war. Al endured interrogation, torture and was one of the soldiers involved in the 1,000-mile march from Breslau to Bremen, before finally being freed by Allied forces in 1945. He served the Canadian Armed Forces for 26 years, taking on many duties until he retired as a Lt. Col. in 1970. But his battles weren’t over. Al didn’t know about a pension supplement that had been set up for veteran POWs in 1976. When he did learn about the supplement in 1991, it took 13 years to get money owed him. He credits MP Betty Hinton for her assistance. “Betty has been working awfully hard. I give her a lot of credit.”

Singh, Gur

Singh, Gur

Dr Gur Singh is a dedicated member of British Colombia’s medical community. He established the first Neurosurgical Unit in the Interior of B.C., as well as the first Neuro Intensive Care Unit. He served on the Board of British Columbia Medical Association for 15 years. Gur was President of the British Columbia Medical Association from 1991-1992. As president of the Downtown Rotary Club, Gur initiated the smoking awareness program for elementary grades in the Kamloops School District. In 1992, Gur was awarded the Canada 125 Anniversary Commemorative Medal, and in 2002 he was awarded the Queens Jubilee Medal.

Gur has been active in the Kamloops Tennis Association serving as its president. Gur sponsored the men’s doubles Dalin-Singh Tournament, along with Bill Dalin, now in its 20th year.

In 2004, Gur helped raise $17,000 for the Kamloops Brain Injury Association through the First Annual Gur Singh Invitational Golf Tournament. (from Arjun Singh)