Schubert, Catherine O’Hare

Schubert, Catherine O'Hare

Catherine was a pioneer settler (b 23 Apr 1835, Rathfryland, Ireland; d 18 July 1918, Armstrong). She moved to America in 1850 with her family and lived in New York until her marriage in 1856 to Augustus Schubert, a German immigrant. The couple moved west to St Paul, MN, then in 1860 north to Fort Garry, where they ran an inn. Two years later they joined a party of Overlanders trekking west to the goldfields. Catherine, with her 3 young children, was the only woman with the party and she gave birth to a fourth child shortly after her arrival at Kamloops. The couple settled at Lillooet and began farming. When Augustus was absent prospecting for gold, she ran the farm and a local school. They moved to land near Armstrong in 1883. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)

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Smith, John Freemont

Smith, John Freemont

Photo compliments of the Kamloops Museum

Best-known as the first alderman of black ancestry in B.C., John Freemont Smith was an active promoter of Kamloops and founder of many civic organizations.

Born in 1850 in the Danish West Indies, John Freemont Smith arrived in Victoria, British Columbia in 1872, where he married. In 1884 the Smiths came to Kamloops, opening a shoe store. Soon after they settled at Louis Creek where John spearheaded mineral exploration in the North Thompson Valley.

Back to Kamloops in 1890, Smith became a newspaper editor and helped to found the Kamloops Agricultural Association (1895), the Conservative Association (1898), and the Board of Trade (1902), among other organizations. He was an alderman on Kamloops City Council (1902-1907) and Indian Agent for the Kamloops District (1912-23).

The Freemont (sic) Block in the 200 block Victoria Street was his office where he died at age 84 in1934. (from Ken Favrholdt)

The Overlanders

The Overlanders

The Overlanders were gold seekers from Ontario who trekked across the western Interior to the Cariboo between 1858 and 1862. Most of them were young men of limited means who hoped to make their fortunes in the Gold Rush. The largest group made the crossing in 1862. Members gathered at the Red River Settlement in Manitoba, and the first group of about 150 people, led by Thomas McMicking, set out early in June. Two smaller groups followed. The main party’s only woman, Catherine Schubert, traveled with her husband and three young children; their fourth child was born after they arrived in BC. They journeyed by Red River cart and packhorse, crossing the plains to Fort Edmonton. Another group went overland south toward Kamloops, two were drowned along the way and the rest almost starved. A few Overlanders found gold in the Cariboo; many remained in BC and went on to have successful careers. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)

McIntosh. James

McIntosh. James

Photo compliments of the Kamloops Museum

The “King of Kamloops” was a Kamloops entrepreneur (b 1842, Ottawa; d 23 June 1901, Kamloops). He came west to BC in 1862 and tried his luck at gold mining in the Cariboo and on Vancouver Island, then moved to Kamloops in 1864. In partnership with William Fortune he built a flour mill and sawmill at Tranquille, then became part of a partnership that built the Shuswap Milling Co. on the Kamloops waterfront in 1877. Over the next several years there was hardly a development in town in which McIntosh was not involved, including the waterworks, the electric light company and the first hospital. As a result he became known as the “King of Kamloops.” (from B.C. Encyclopedia)

Mclean, Donald

Mclean, Donald

Photo compliments of the Kamloops Museum

Don was a fur trader (b 1805, Tobermory, Scotland; d 17 July 1864 near Chilko Lake). He joined the HBC in 1833 and served in the Oregon Territory until he transferred to Fort Alexandria on the upper Fraser River in 1842. For the next 18 years he rose through the ranks, serving at different posts in New Caledonia until he was put in charge of Fort Kamloops in 1855. He was an effective trader known for harsh treatment of his First Nations clients. In 1860 he resigned from the HBC rather than accept a transfer out of BC. With his family he settled at Hat Creek south of Clinton, where he farmed, raised livestock and ran a stopping place on the Cariboo Wagon Road. In 1864, during the so-called Chilcotin War, he joined the pursuit of the fugitive Tsilhqot’in and was shot and killed by one of them. His sons were members of the notorious Mclean Gang of outlaws. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)

Fortune, William

Fortune, William

William was a farmer, businessman (b 1838, Yorkshire, England; d 1 Dec 1914, Kamloops). After immigrating to Ontario, he joined the party of Overlanders who travelled across the continent in 1862 to join the Cariboo Gold Rush. He worked for the HBC in Kamloops, then moved west to settle at Tranquille, where he developed a ranch and farm and built the first flour mill in the Interior. In 1878 he built the sidewheel steamer Lady Dufferin to haul supplies on the Thompson and Shuswap waterways. He sold his property for use as a tuberculosis sanitarium in 1907 and returned to Kamloops, where he was prominent in business until his death. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)

Tod, John

Tod, John

John was a fur trader (b Oct 1794, Dumbartonshire, Scotland; d 31 Aug 1882, Victoria). He came to Canada in 1811 as a clerk with the HBC attached to Lord Selkirk’s group of colonists bound for the Red River. In 1840 he took command of Fort Alexandria on the upper Fraser River, and he served as senior officer at Fort Thompson (Kamloops) from 1842 to 1849. In failing health, he retired from the HBC in 1850 after almost 40 years in its service, and settled near Fort Victoria. In 1851 he was appointed to the Legislative Council advising the governor of Vancouver Island, a position he held until 1858 when he resigned to devote all his energies to his farm and his sizable family. The Tod home is now a heritage house. Tod Mt near Kamloops is named for him, as is Tod Inlet on southern Vancouver Island. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)