Black. Samuel

Black. Samuel

Photo compliments of the Kamloops Museum

Samual was a fur trader (b 3 May 1780, Pitsligo, Scotland; d 8 Feb 1841, Kamloops). He came to Canada in 1802 and served for many years with the North West Co. at at trading posts in the Athabasca District. Stopping at nothing to defeat his HBC competitors, he was a notorious ruffian and bully. When the HBC absorbed the NWC in 1821, Black was refused a job in the reorganized company because of his history. But in 1823 he was taken on as officer in charge at Fort St John on the upper Peace River. He moved posts regularly until 1830, when he was stationed at Thompson’s River Post (Kamloops). In 1837 he became chief factor in charge of all the posts in the district. Black was never much of a diplomat, and his relations with the Aboriginal people were poor. It was not unexpected when a dispute with a Secwepemc (Shuswap) chief ended in Black’s murder. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)

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McIntosh. James

McIntosh. James

Photo compliments of the Kamloops Museum

The “King of Kamloops” was a Kamloops entrepreneur (b 1842, Ottawa; d 23 June 1901, Kamloops). He came west to BC in 1862 and tried his luck at gold mining in the Cariboo and on Vancouver Island, then moved to Kamloops in 1864. In partnership with William Fortune he built a flour mill and sawmill at Tranquille, then became part of a partnership that built the Shuswap Milling Co. on the Kamloops waterfront in 1877. Over the next several years there was hardly a development in town in which McIntosh was not involved, including the waterworks, the electric light company and the first hospital. As a result he became known as the “King of Kamloops.” (from B.C. Encyclopedia)

Mclean, Donald

Mclean, Donald

Photo compliments of the Kamloops Museum

Don was a fur trader (b 1805, Tobermory, Scotland; d 17 July 1864 near Chilko Lake). He joined the HBC in 1833 and served in the Oregon Territory until he transferred to Fort Alexandria on the upper Fraser River in 1842. For the next 18 years he rose through the ranks, serving at different posts in New Caledonia until he was put in charge of Fort Kamloops in 1855. He was an effective trader known for harsh treatment of his First Nations clients. In 1860 he resigned from the HBC rather than accept a transfer out of BC. With his family he settled at Hat Creek south of Clinton, where he farmed, raised livestock and ran a stopping place on the Cariboo Wagon Road. In 1864, during the so-called Chilcotin War, he joined the pursuit of the fugitive Tsilhqot’in and was shot and killed by one of them. His sons were members of the notorious Mclean Gang of outlaws. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)

Fortune, William

Fortune, William

William was a farmer, businessman (b 1838, Yorkshire, England; d 1 Dec 1914, Kamloops). After immigrating to Ontario, he joined the party of Overlanders who travelled across the continent in 1862 to join the Cariboo Gold Rush. He worked for the HBC in Kamloops, then moved west to settle at Tranquille, where he developed a ranch and farm and built the first flour mill in the Interior. In 1878 he built the sidewheel steamer Lady Dufferin to haul supplies on the Thompson and Shuswap waterways. He sold his property for use as a tuberculosis sanitarium in 1907 and returned to Kamloops, where he was prominent in business until his death. (from B.C. Encyclopedia)