Dickens, Richard “Dick”

Born March 12, 1942 in Los Angeles, California, died March 22, 2009 in Kamloops. Dick emigrated to Canada with parents and sister in October 1956. He Graduated from U.B.C.’s new faculty of music in 1964, and taught music in Revelstoke before settling in Kamloops. In addition to being an outstanding teacher, Dick was an outspoken political activist who rallied to keep the Coquihalla Highway from being privatized, and refused to compromise his ideals and morals as a school board trustee.

He lashed out at the provincial government for inadequate education funding. After he resigned from the school board, he turned his energies toward helping the homeless. He became an active member of a group called Changing the Face of Poverty, which is bringing together social, political, religious and health agencies to find ways that will truly make a difference for the plight of the homeless in Kamloops (from Kamloops Daily News).

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Duckworth, Elisabeth

Duckworth, Elisabeth

photo courtesy the Kamloops Daily News

Elisabeth Duckworth (born in Richmond Hill, Ontario, 1958) moved to Kamloops in 1975 when her father took a position at the Kamloops First Baptist church. She graduated the next year from Kamloops Senior secondary, and studied archeology and history at the University of Toronto. Elisabeth got a job at the Kamloops museum as assistant archivist in November 1988 when Ken Favrholt was in charge. He left a year later, and she took over as acting curator/archivist for a year before being made permanent. She retired from the museum in 2013. “Even though, working in a museum, we’re still working for the future, not the past,” Elisabeth told Kamloops This Week. (Kamloops Daily News, Kamloops This Week)

Chamberlain, James

Chamberlain, James

James was an aerospace designer and engineer (b 23 May 1915, Kamloops; d 8 Mar 1981, Houston, TX). He was educated at the University of Toronto and the Imperial College of Science and Technology in London England. James help engineer the ill-fated R.C.A.F. Avro Arrow. He and about 2,000 other engineers worked eight years to get the CF-105 supersonic Arrow interceptor into production as the world’s fastest jet fighter. Prime Minister John Diefenbaker scrapped the entire operation in 1959. Scrapping of the Arrow threw thousands out of work and Canada lost 100 key engineers to the U.S. and Britain. James and 23 other engineers promptly went to the U.S. and went to work with N.A.S.A. where he worked on the Mercury capsule in which astronaut John Glenn orbited the earth three times in 1962. Despite being the most advanced plane in the world, James had no regrets about the Arrow

Clark, Jim

Clark, Jim

Jim was born and died in Kamloops (1917 – 1989), the son of one of Kamloops first Lawyers. After serving Overseas in WWII he settled in the Okanagan with his wife Hazel. In 1952 Jim moved back to Kamloops and worked as City Clerk. He assisted in the amalgamation of Kamloops, North Kamloops and Valleyview. Jim held board or Executive Positions with the School District 24, Kamloops United Church, Sea Cadets, Civil Defense, Cancer Society, Kamloops Museum, and Royal Inland Hospital. Through his tutelage, some of his children and grandchildren continue to contribute to this growing city.

In April 1989 Jim was made a Freeman of the City of Kamloops, a few months before he passed away of ALS. Jim was a quiet gentleman who never sought recognition for his work in the community and is remembered as “a real prince of a man.” (from Bobbi Clark)